☰ MENU

Sewer Department

Meet our Sewer Crew

From Left:  Gary Tate, Jamie Whitley, Ron Lee (Foreman), Neal Parsons, Julian Moss

The first sewers in Hannibal were constructed around the turn of the century and consisted of combined systems carrying both storm and sanitary waste. In 1968, a sewer bond was passed by the voters of Hannibal to separate the storm and sanitary waste by adding several thousand feet of new sewer lines and constructing lift stations to carry sewage to the Wastewater Treatment Plant. Presently, the Board of Public Works maintains approximately 141 miles of sewer mains.

Throughout the year, the sewer crew is busy maintaining and repairing city sewer lines.  This involves:

Weather permitting, the crew is responsible for these tasks year-round.  However, during seasons of high rain, the crew is careful to inspect areas where water, other than wastewater, enters the sewer system.  This type of water, called Infiltration/Inflow (I/I), can reduce the capacity and capablity of sewer systems and treatment facilities to transport and treat wastewater. 

Wastewater Treatment Plant

Back Row:  From Left - Corey Means, George Hausdorf (Plant Supervisor), Rodney Spires
Front Row:  From Left - Jamie Whitley, Devon Meuhring, Jeff Williams

In 1981, Hannibal's new Wastewater Treatment Plant was put into operation. The facility is an aerobic plant which means that only oxygen (no chemicals) is used. Renovations to the existing plant were completed to reroute the Plant's outflow from Bear Creek to the Mississippi River and make other improvements.

The wastewater treatment process has many stages.  First the wastewater flows through the grit and dewatering area where it is screened or filtered to remove rags, sticks, and other large debris that would damage equipment or interfere with the treatment process.  Then the wastewater goes through a grit removal system that allows sand, gravel, and other particles to settle out, while organic matter remains suspended in the wastewater.  From there, the raw wastewater gets oxygen enriched and flows into the reactor/digester before proceeding to the primary clarifier where it comes into contact with activated sludge, which contains microorganisms that decompose the organic material.  Next the wastewater passes into secondary clarifiers where sludge settles to the bottom and the liquid continues to the Mississippi River.  Sludge is removed from the clarifier and sent to an aerobic digester where it is heated for several weeks to destroy any remaining pathogens. 

Waste Water Treatment Facility - South Arch Street

The first sewers in Hannibal were constructed around the turn of the century and consisted of combined systems carrying both storm and sanitary waste. In 1968, a sewer bond was passed by the voters of Hannibal to separate the storm and sanitary waste by adding several thousand feet of new sewer lines and constructing lift stations to carry sewage to the Wastewater Treatment Plant.  

Currently the processing average per day is 3 million gallons with a capacity of 6 million gallons per day. Preliminary studies are taking place to determine the improvement processes that will be phased in over the next several years through multiple projects.

Presently, the Board of Public Works maintains approximately 270 miles of sewer mains.